Tags

, , , , , , , , , , ,

 

Mariela Cordero (Valencia, Venezuela, 1985) is a lawyer, poet, writer, translator and visual artist. 

Her poetry has been published in several international anthologies and she has received some distinctions, including, Third Prize of Poetry Alejandra Pizarnik, Argentina (2014) ; First Prize in the II Liberoamerican Poetry Contest Euler Granda, Ecuador (2015); Second Prize for Poetry, Concorso Letterario Internazionale Bilingüe Tracceperlameta Edizioni,Italy (2015); and First Place in International Poetry Contest AniversarioPoetasHispanos, Spain (2016). 

She is the author of the book of poems “ El cuerpo de la duda ” Ediciones Publicarte Caracas, Venezuela (2013). Her poems have been translated into Hindi, Czech, Serbian, Shona, Uzbek, Romanian, Macedonia, Hebrew, and many other languages. She currently coordinates the sections PoesíaVenezolana and PoetasdelMundo in the Revista Abierta de Poesía Poémame ( Spain ).  

Interruption of the Light 

When the lights went out 

Our hearts were inhabited by fateful fables 

the night-once beloved-was baptized 

by the sowing of panic 

We were close to one another 

And blood spread in the penumbra 

Like an alluring perfume. 

Many navigated by scent 

And desired to bathe in a convulsing red river 

When the lights returned,hours later 

We didnt recognize our faces 

Splashed with the bestial grins. 

Our land was filled with bodies, 

                                         mutilated, 

We listened to moans of pain, 

Saw our hands stained with blame 

And it was too late when we discovered 

That we,too,were fatally wounded. 

Translation by Aaron Devine 

Love the shadow 

Invasions of light are usually corrosive  

to what lives in the shadows. 

 It is easy to love the dark,  

the coldness with the smell of torrid vegetation.  

Peace and danger amalgamated  

in the mouth of the inviolable black horizon.  

Swim forever in an ocean woven of gloom,  

protected only by the irregular flapping 

 of birds dressed like the night.  

Without hurtful illuminations the meaning can be spilled, 

 you can embrace languid hopes  

and caress the symptoms of a rainy and exquisite love. 

 In the shadow we are all dark stars. 

A dream for the summer 

In your hand will dance an unexpected map, 

 invented to find  fountains and water accidents  

in the avenues of this city that is melting.  

The dawn will know how to hide its dew 

 when our thirst turns violent.  

 The night will lie hesitantly on the grass.  

Our only instinct will be to seek 

 under the skirts of the earth  

and kiss it until the center of its humidity. 

This season will blossom as a prelude to fire.  

Summer will be the liberation of the ardor 

 that always strikes us within. 

The unprecedented dance that will go out to heat the street and the bodies. 

The first. 

I am the first 

I’m at the beginning 

Of time 

In the middle of the gloom 

In the particle 

Of this sunset 

And to the edge 

Of the collapse. 

I am all 

And none. 

Public Body

I don’t inhabit a country; I inhabit a body 

—broken— 

meekly unfurling 

over voracious ruins 

and breathing the smoke of burnt days. 

I don’t inhabit a country; I inhabit a body 

without bloom 

that suffers 

stripped of respite 

the indelible tremors 

of the recently raped. 

I don’t inhabit a country; I inhabit a body 

flush with bones 

                trained 

like knives 

that turn cruelly 

against whoever dares 

                maneuver 

a tentative caress 

across its devastated surface. 

This body 

does not recognize all that is not 

a bruise, 

an unclosable wound, 

or an abrupt act of depredation. 

I don’t inhabit a country; I inhabit a body 

—ravaged— 

that dances with massacre 

and, impregnated by the most wretched 

of the rabid pack,  

only knows to birth death. 

I don’t inhabit a country; I inhabit a public body 

so diminished 

that it’s hurt by my faint footsteps 

and tormented by the murmur of my hope. 

I curl into myself, 

into a tiny docile place 

lethargic 

from the irregular pulse 

of its fabled, bygone beauty 

as I devour 

each detail of its meager heat. 

I curl into myself 

and hope that morning 

astonishes us with proof 

that both 

this body I inhabit and I 

                —survive— 

the long night 

            of the pack. 

Translation by Aaron Devine